Printed binder’s waste. Discovered by Tiffany Esteban of Dr. Terry Harpold’s University of Florida course Paratexts.

From the spine of Svenskt och Tyskt Hand-Lexicon, v. 1, by Carl Heinrich (1834). Original from the Bavarian State Library. Digitized May 11, 2011.

"A Post-it note with the word STOP written in red ink.” Discovered by Christina Foliacci of Dr. Terry Harpold’s University of Florida course Paratexts.

From p. 8 of Manual on the Cultivation of the Sugar Cane: and the Fabrication and Refinement of Sugar by Benjamin Silliman (1833). Original from Harvard University. Digitized September 12, 2007.

"To feel the peculiar resonance of this charming dedication you need to know that Cyrus Smith is the chief protagonist of Jules Verne’s 1874 novel The Mysterious Island [L’Île mystérieuse]. One of Verne’s masterpieces and the most important Robinsonade of the 19th century, it is deeply and openly indebted to Defoe’s novel. And you need to know that the action of Verne’s novel begins in February 1865, presumably after Mr. Smith – the excellent speller rewarded with the gift of this book – completed his Winter term.” 

Discovered by Dr. Terry Harpold, currently teaching a course on Paratexts at the University of Florida.

From the front matter of Robinson Crusoe, Jr: A Story for Little Folks by Oliver Optic (1864). Original from the New York Public Library. Digitized July 18, 2007.

Text photographed through both sides of a hole in the page.

From p. 1-2 of A Hue and Cry After Conscience: or, The Pilgrims Progress by Candle-light by John Dunton (1681). Original from Lyon Public Library (Bibliothèque jésuite des Fontaines). Digitized September 14, 2010.

Palimpsestic inscription. Discovered by Katherine Marchese of Dr. Terry Harpold’s University of Florida course Paratexts.

From the front matter of The Dead Sea, v. 1, by William Allen (1855). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized June 8, 2007.

Pictorial endpapers populated by library artifacts.

From My Book House, v. 1, edited by Olive Beaupré Miller (1920). Does not include metadata indicating library of origination or date of digitization (but does include Stanford library artifacts).

Someone should try to make this, even though it’s “Not Approved.”

"Orange Marmalade: Take the cleanest Sevilla oranges that can be obtained. Cut them in two, take out all the pulp and juice, carefully removing all the seeds and white skin, and put it into a basin. Boil the rinds in hard water until they are tender, changing the water two or three times while they are boiling; then pound them in a marble mortar* and add to them the juice and pulp. Put the whole into a preserving pan with double the weight of sugar. Set over a slow fire, boil it 35 minutes, then put it into a jar with brandy paper over. *Or cut them into strips or pieces."

From the front matter of The London Art of Cookery, and Housekeeper’s Complete Assistant by John Farley (1787). Original from Oxford University. Digitized May 1, 2007.

Illustrations composed of and trapped by linked table of contents.

From My Book House, v. 1, ed. by Olive Beaupré Miller (1920). Does not include metadata indicating library of origination or date of digitization (but does include Stanford library artifacts).