January 2, 2013
Neon moiré. Submitted by TJ Owens. 
The plate “What Giant Oxen,” from From the Earth to the Moon: Direct in Ninety-seven Hours and Twenty Minutes: and a Trip Round It by Jules Verne (1890). Original from Harvard University. Digitized July 17, 2008.

Neon moiré. Submitted by TJ Owens

The plate “What Giant Oxen,” from From the Earth to the Moon: Direct in Ninety-seven Hours and Twenty Minutes: and a Trip Round It by Jules Verne (1890). Original from Harvard University. Digitized July 17, 2008.

October 14, 2012
"To feel the peculiar resonance of this charming dedication you need to know that Cyrus Smith is the chief protagonist of Jules Verne’s 1874 novel The Mysterious Island [L’Île mystérieuse]. One of Verne’s masterpieces and the most important Robinsonade of the 19th century, it is deeply and openly indebted to Defoe’s novel. And you need to know that the action of Verne’s novel begins in February 1865, presumably after Mr. Smith – the excellent speller rewarded with the gift of this book – completed his Winter term.” 
Discovered by Dr. Terry Harpold, currently teaching a course on Paratexts at the University of Florida.
From the front matter of Robinson Crusoe, Jr: A Story for Little Folks by Oliver Optic (1864). Original from the New York Public Library. Digitized July 18, 2007.

"To feel the peculiar resonance of this charming dedication you need to know that Cyrus Smith is the chief protagonist of Jules Verne’s 1874 novel The Mysterious Island [L’Île mystérieuse]. One of Verne’s masterpieces and the most important Robinsonade of the 19th century, it is deeply and openly indebted to Defoe’s novel. And you need to know that the action of Verne’s novel begins in February 1865, presumably after Mr. Smith – the excellent speller rewarded with the gift of this book – completed his Winter term.” 

Discovered by Dr. Terry Harpold, currently teaching a course on Paratexts at the University of Florida.

From the front matter of Robinson Crusoe, Jr: A Story for Little Folks by Oliver Optic (1864). Original from the New York Public Library. Digitized July 18, 2007.

April 4, 2012

"The search term I used was, interestingly enough, "Advanced Book Search" - after seeing it relentlessly as the title of one of my browsing tabs."

Submitted by Paul Sabayrac, of Dr. Terry Harpold’s University of Florida course Hypermedia: Futures of Reading.

From the front matter of Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne (1873). Original from Harvard University. Digitized April 15, 2008.

February 25, 2012
Light shines on the wreck of the Florida: black and white plate digitized in color, with orange and blue neon effect.
From p. 98 (?) of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne (1874). 

Light shines on the wreck of the Florida: black and white plate digitized in color, with orange and blue neon effect.

From p. 98 (?) of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne (1874). 

February 24, 2012
University of Michigan Library paper ephemera over title page: “Attention Reader: / This volume is too fragile for any future repair. / Please handle with great care.” 
From The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne, ills. N. C. Wyeth (1920). 

University of Michigan Library paper ephemera over title page: “Attention Reader: / This volume is too fragile for any future repair. / Please handle with great care.” 

From The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne, ills. N. C. Wyeth (1920). 

February 23, 2012
A group of men sojourning along the beach toward a University of Michigan Libraries stamp that has appeared in the landscape.
From the front endpapers of The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne (1920).

A group of men sojourning along the beach toward a University of Michigan Libraries stamp that has appeared in the landscape.

From the front endpapers of The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne (1920).

February 23, 2012

Address written onto bookplate matched to present-day address in Google Maps.

From the front matter of An Antarctic Mystery, by Jules Verne, trans. Mrs. Cashel Hoey (1899). (Map)