November 10, 2012
Finding poetry in the Thames: Artist Krissy Wilson talks to Zoë Large about how mudlarking has inspired her to create public mosaic poems, and her explorations of London’s murky river foreshore

Check out one of my forthcoming projects and follow Detritus: Poems from the Thames Foreshore! —Krissy

November 2, 2012
Map of London and Thames left folded.
From On the Mode of Communication of Cholera by John Snow (1855). Original from the Bavarian State Library. Digitized December 1, 2009. 

Map of London and Thames left folded.

From On the Mode of Communication of Cholera by John Snow (1855). Original from the Bavarian State Library. Digitized December 1, 2009. 

October 31, 2012
"Estuary tide runs up pages of the Thames." Submitted by John McVey (asfaltics). 
From p. 612-17 (James Walker’s “On the Improvement of the Thames”) in The Nautical Magazine: A Journal of Papers on Subjects Connected with Maritime Affairs, v. 11 (1842). Original from Oxford University. Digitized October 25, 2006.

"Estuary tide runs up pages of the Thames." Submitted by John McVey (asfaltics). 

From p. 612-17 (James Walker’s “On the Improvement of the Thames”) in The Nautical Magazine: A Journal of Papers on Subjects Connected with Maritime Affairs, v. 11 (1842). Original from Oxford University. Digitized October 25, 2006.

June 22, 2012
kcarenwilson:

Detritus: Poems from the Thames Foreshore Krissy Wilson is searching for textual artifacts in London’s river midden and assembling them into public, mosaic poems.

This is the process blog for my forthcoming Fulbright application, and it features a pique assiette mix of found objects, Victorian perspective on the Thames mudlarkers, folk art, tales of beachcombers worldwide, memoryware, and textual mosaic. 

Mosaic artists, poets, Londoners, beachcombers, anthropologists, and scholars of all kinds: I’d like for you to check out my latest project and I’d like even better to collaborate with you. 

kcarenwilson:

Detritus: Poems from the Thames Foreshore Krissy Wilson is searching for textual artifacts in London’s river midden and assembling them into public, mosaic poems.

This is the process blog for my forthcoming Fulbright application, and it features a pique assiette mix of found objects, Victorian perspective on the Thames mudlarkers, folk art, tales of beachcombers worldwide, memoryware, and textual mosaic. 

Mosaic artists, poets, Londoners, beachcombers, anthropologists, and scholars of all kinds: I’d like for you to check out my latest project and I’d like even better to collaborate with you. 

(via krissywilson)

September 13, 2011
Map left folded through digitization.
From p. xxxvi of A Treatise on the Commerce and Police of the River Thames by Patrick Colquhoun (1800). [Here]

Map left folded through digitization.

From p. xxxvi of A Treatise on the Commerce and Police of the River Thames by Patrick Colquhoun (1800). [Here]