September 11, 2011

Black and white printed plates digitized in color; neon orange and blue result.

From various pages of Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, v. 4 (1852). [Here]

September 9, 2011
Anomalies and Curiosities of the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s LiteratureAn exhibit making the case for (very) used books
Closing reception - 9/12Final day - 9/15
The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature contains more than 100,000 volumes, many of which were used by children. The interaction of the child and the book is evident in the mark of the hand in the Baldwin; there are many examples of marginalia, doodles and inscriptions, bookplates, prize books, crayon scrawl, hand-colored plates, love notes and book curses. In addition, many of these books have been used so heavily that they expose somnotexts, or sleeping texts, of scrap paper that were bound into the spines of nineteenth century children’s books as padding. These fragments, traditionally referred to as binder’s waste, revel in their eccentricity; handwritten sheet music, surgical texts, advertisements for moth killer, Shakespeare and artifacts of the bindery have all survived in this manner. These unusual para- and peritextual phenomenon are now on display!Haven’t had a chance to stop by the exhibit yet? That’s alright—It’ll be open for one more week, until Thursday, September 15th. It’s on the second floor of Smathers Library East, by the Special Collections reading room, and is open from 9am to 4pm, weekdays.Most importantly, there will be a closing reception at 5pm on Monday, September 12th, with refreshments and a brief talk by the curator, English undergraduate Krissy Wilson, professors Dr. John Cech, Dr. Terry Harpold, Dr. Kenneth Kidd, and Dr. Anastasia Ulanowicz, as well as the department chair of Special and Area Studies Collections at the UF libraries, Richard Bennett. If you’re planning on seeing Cary Nelson that evening, why not get there a little bit early? We hope to see you there!More informationAnomalies and Curiosities - Facebook, UF Digital CollectionsMore about the Baldwin - Center for Children’s Literature and Culture, Special and Area Studies CollectionsCary Nelson - Something Wicked This Way Comes—How to Save the University

Anomalies and Curiosities of the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature
An exhibit making the case for (very) used books

Closing reception - 9/12
Final day - 9/15

The Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature contains more than 100,000 volumes, many of which were used by children. The interaction of the child and the book is evident in the mark of the hand in the Baldwin; there are many examples of marginalia, doodles and inscriptions, bookplates, prize books, crayon scrawl, hand-colored plates, love notes and book curses. In addition, many of these books have been used so heavily that they expose somnotexts, or sleeping texts, of scrap paper that were bound into the spines of nineteenth century children’s books as padding. These fragments, traditionally referred to as binder’s waste, revel in their eccentricity; handwritten sheet music, surgical texts, advertisements for moth killer, Shakespeare and artifacts of the bindery have all survived in this manner. These unusual para- and peritextual phenomenon are now on display!

Haven’t had a chance to stop by the exhibit yet? That’s alright—It’ll be open for one more week, until Thursday, September 15th. It’s on the second floor of Smathers Library East, by the Special Collections reading room, and is open from 9am to 4pm, weekdays.

Most importantly, there will be a closing reception at 5pm on Monday, September 12th, with refreshments and a brief talk by the curator, English undergraduate Krissy Wilson, professors Dr. John Cech, Dr. Terry Harpold, Dr. Kenneth Kidd, and Dr. Anastasia Ulanowicz, as well as the department chair of Special and Area Studies Collections at the UF libraries, Richard Bennett. If you’re planning on seeing Cary Nelson that evening, why not get there a little bit early? We hope to see you there!

More information
Anomalies and Curiosities - FacebookUF Digital Collections
More about the Baldwin - Center for Children’s Literature and CultureSpecial and Area Studies Collections
Cary Nelson - Something Wicked This Way Comes—How to Save the University

August 26, 2011

Come out tonight and see a 6 minutes and 40 second presentation about The Art of Google Books!

7pm, Pecha Kucha Vol. 6 at Volta Coffee, Tea & Chocolate in Gainesville, Florida.

Be there, or be square! —kcw

Top: The ravages of the elements; fire and water damage in Google Books.
Bottom: Library artifacts; bookplates, stamps, checkout slips &c. in Google Books.

August 16, 2011

“The Baldwin Library of Children’s Historical Literature contains more than 100,000 volumes, many of which were used by children.

The interaction of the child and the book is evident in the mark of the hand in the Baldwin; there are many examples of marginalia, doodles and inscriptions, bookplates, prize books, crayon scrawl, hand-colored plates, love notes and book anathema.

In addition, many of these books have been used so heavily that they expose somnotexts, or sleeping texts, of scrap paper that were bound into the spines of nineteenth century children’s books as padding. These fragments, traditionally referred to as binder’s waste, revel in their eccentricity; handwritten sheet music, surgical texts, advertisements for moth killer, Shakespeare and artifacts of the bindery have all survived in this manner.

These unusual para- and peritextual phenomenon will be on display as part of the exhibit curated by Krissy Wilson.”

The exhibit is open from August 1st to September 15th, 2011.

2nd floor, George A. Smathers Library East
Gainesville, FL

Posters, three-fold pamphlet, and object list via UF Digital Collections.
Check hours here. RSVP on Facebook.

One of the many uses of Google Books; finding the origin of scraps of text from the nineteenth century with creative Boolean queries! —kcw

(Source: orionthecoffeemaker, via fuckyeahpicturebooks)

July 25, 2011
"The Baldwin Library of Children’s Historical Literature contains more than 100,000 volumes, many of which were used by children.
The interaction of the child and the book is evident in the mark of the hand in the Baldwin; there are many examples of marginalia, doodles and inscriptions, bookplates, prize books, crayon scrawl, hand-colored plates, love notes and book anathema.
In addition, many of these books have been used so heavily that they expose somnotexts, or sleeping texts, of scrap paper that were bound into the spines of nineteenth century children’s books as padding. These fragments, traditionally referred to as binder’s waste, revel in their eccentricity; handwritten sheet music, surgical texts, advertisements for moth killer, Shakespeare and artifacts of the bindery have all survived in this manner.
These unusual para- and peritextual phenomenon will be on display as part of the exhibit curated by Krissy Wilson.”
The exhibit will open on August 1st.
2nd floor, George A. Smathers Library EastGainesville, FL
RSVP on Facebook. Check hours here.

"The Baldwin Library of Children’s Historical Literature contains more than 100,000 volumes, many of which were used by children.

The interaction of the child and the book is evident in the mark of the hand in the Baldwin; there are many examples of marginalia, doodles and inscriptions, bookplates, prize books, crayon scrawl, hand-colored plates, love notes and book anathema.

In addition, many of these books have been used so heavily that they expose somnotexts, or sleeping texts, of scrap paper that were bound into the spines of nineteenth century children’s books as padding. These fragments, traditionally referred to as binder’s waste, revel in their eccentricity; handwritten sheet music, surgical texts, advertisements for moth killer, Shakespeare and artifacts of the bindery have all survived in this manner.

These unusual para- and peritextual phenomenon will be on display as part of the exhibit curated by Krissy Wilson.”

The exhibit will open on August 1st.

2nd floor, George A. Smathers Library East
Gainesville, FL

RSVP on Facebook. Check hours here.