April 30, 2013

Severe distortion: “a remarkable collection of (what can only be described as) hallucinogenic architectural views and plans.” Pointed out by asfaltics here.

Throughout The Builder, v. 77 (1899). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized February 26, 2011.

January 28, 2013

Thematic foxing.

Throughout llustrations of the Public Buildings of London: With Historical and Descriptive Accounts of Each Edifice by John Britton and Augustus Pugin (1825). Original from the New York Public Library. Digitized May 13, 2008.

January 12, 2013
Hybridized diagram (plate left folded).
Frontispiece comparing the heights of buildings from The World’s Religions by George Thomas Bettany (1890). Original from the University of California. Digitized February 18, 2011.

Hybridized diagram (plate left folded).

Frontispiece comparing the heights of buildings from The World’s Religions by George Thomas Bettany (1890). Original from the University of California. Digitized February 18, 2011.

October 7, 2012

Hybrid architecture (plates left folded). 

From p. 70801 of Repertorium Ecclesiasticum Parochiale Londinense by Richard Newcourt (1708). Original from the New York Public Library. Digitized June 14, 2011.

September 24, 2012
Hybrid architecture (duplicated around the gutter). 
From The Coffee-Planter: or, An Essay on the Cultivation and Manufacturing that Article of West-India Produce by John Lowandes (1807). Original from Harvard University. Digitized May 19, 2008.

Hybrid architecture (duplicated around the gutter). 

From The Coffee-Planter: or, An Essay on the Cultivation and Manufacturing that Article of West-India Produce by John Lowandes (1807). Original from Harvard University. Digitized May 19, 2008.

August 31, 2012

Hybrid architecture created by folded plates.

Throughout Monasticon Anglicanum by Roger Dodsworth (1673). Original from Lyon Public Library. Digitized November 5, 2010.

January 7, 2012

Plates left folded through digitization, creating alternative floor plans and impossible buildings.

From various pages of Rural Architecture in the Chinese Taste by John and William Halfpenny (1755).