September 25, 2013
Erasure poem.
From The Narrative and Affidavit-men Detected: or, Collcott and Robin Put to the Blush (1730). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 30, 2009.

Erasure poem.

From The Narrative and Affidavit-men Detected: or, Collcott and Robin Put to the Blush (1730). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 30, 2009.

May 5, 2013
Torn paper poem.
From the back matter of A Princess of Java: A Tale of the Far East by Sarah Jane Higginson (1887). Original from Harvard University. Digitized July 25, 2008.

Torn paper poem.

From the back matter of A Princess of Java: A Tale of the Far East by Sarah Jane Higginson (1887). Original from Harvard University. Digitized July 25, 2008.

April 13, 2013
Marginalia: “Bright with this star’s reflected glow— / Brighter, since Christ too [dared?] to go!”
From p. 82 of Youth: And Other Poems by Charles Hanson Towne (1911). Original from Harvard University. Digitized February 23, 2009.

Marginalia: “Bright with this star’s reflected glow— / Brighter, since Christ too [dared?] to go!”

From p. 82 of Youth: And Other Poems by Charles Hanson Towne (1911). Original from Harvard University. Digitized February 23, 2009.

March 24, 2013
A saucy bookplate: “A Pleader to the Needer When a Reader.”
From the back matter of England’s Path to Wealth and Honour, In a Dialogue Between an English-man and a Dutch-man by James Puckle (1718). Original from Oxford University. Digitized July 4, 2006.

A saucy bookplate: “A Pleader to the Needer When a Reader.”

From the back matter of England’s Path to Wealth and Honour, In a Dialogue Between an English-man and a Dutch-man by James Puckle (1718). Original from Oxford University. Digitized July 4, 2006.

March 4, 2013
"Vacant Places" pasted in.
From the front matter of Verses for My Children by Eleanor Crewdson (1849). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 27, 2007.

"Vacant Places" pasted in.

From the front matter of Verses for My Children by Eleanor Crewdson (1849). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 27, 2007.

February 13, 2013
Plate left folded.
From Who Was My Grandfather? by Sir Ambrose Hardinge Giffard and Edward Giffard (1865). Original from Pennsylvania State University. Digitized April 24, 2009.

Plate left folded.

From Who Was My Grandfather? by Sir Ambrose Hardinge Giffard and Edward Giffard (1865). Original from Pennsylvania State University. Digitized April 24, 2009.

October 14, 2012
Torn page reveals poem.
From p. 152 of Tales of Men and Ghosts by Edith Wharton (1914). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 13, 2008. 

Torn page reveals poem.

From p. 152 of Tales of Men and Ghosts by Edith Wharton (1914). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 13, 2008. 

September 14, 2012
Motion, movement, the turning page.
From p. 288-290 of Mackenzie’s Five Thousand Receipts In All the Useful and Domestic Arts by Colin MacKenzie (1831). Original from Harvard University. Digitized November 8, 2005.

Motion, movement, the turning page.

From p. 288-290 of Mackenzie’s Five Thousand Receipts In All the Useful and Domestic Arts by Colin MacKenzie (1831). Original from Harvard University. Digitized November 8, 2005.

June 22, 2012
kcarenwilson:

Detritus: Poems from the Thames Foreshore Krissy Wilson is searching for textual artifacts in London’s river midden and assembling them into public, mosaic poems.

This is the process blog for my forthcoming Fulbright application, and it features a pique assiette mix of found objects, Victorian perspective on the Thames mudlarkers, folk art, tales of beachcombers worldwide, memoryware, and textual mosaic. 

Mosaic artists, poets, Londoners, beachcombers, anthropologists, and scholars of all kinds: I’d like for you to check out my latest project and I’d like even better to collaborate with you. 

kcarenwilson:

Detritus: Poems from the Thames Foreshore Krissy Wilson is searching for textual artifacts in London’s river midden and assembling them into public, mosaic poems.

This is the process blog for my forthcoming Fulbright application, and it features a pique assiette mix of found objects, Victorian perspective on the Thames mudlarkers, folk art, tales of beachcombers worldwide, memoryware, and textual mosaic. 

Mosaic artists, poets, Londoners, beachcombers, anthropologists, and scholars of all kinds: I’d like for you to check out my latest project and I’d like even better to collaborate with you. 

(via krissywilson)

June 21, 2012
Piece of paper photographed over page alters text from “Stone Age Folks” to “Tone Age Folks.”
From The Confessions of a Beachcomber: Scenes and Incidents in the Career of an Unprofessional Beachcomber in Tropical Queensland by Edmund James Banfield (1908). Original from Harvard University. Digitized December 28, 2007.

Piece of paper photographed over page alters text from “Stone Age Folks” to “Tone Age Folks.”

From The Confessions of a Beachcomber: Scenes and Incidents in the Career of an Unprofessional Beachcomber in Tropical Queensland by Edmund James Banfield (1908). Original from Harvard University. Digitized December 28, 2007.

June 11, 2012
Pages in motion.
From p. 44-53 (?) of From the Font to the Altar by Conyngham Ellis (1854). Original from Oxford University. Digitized August 30, 2006.

Pages in motion.

From p. 44-53 (?) of From the Font to the Altar by Conyngham Ellis (1854). Original from Oxford University. Digitized August 30, 2006.

February 17, 2012
Poem pasted above half title, with commentary.
From the front matter of Graffiti D’Italia by William Wetmore Story (1868). 

Poem pasted above half title, with commentary.

From the front matter of Graffiti D’Italia by William Wetmore Story (1868). 

June 4, 2011
A rhyme: “Baccus may give us Wine / That we may cherefully w[hine?]” in ink, with crossed-out words and stamp of ownership
From front endpapers of The Tea-Table Miscellany by Allan Ramsay (1750). [Here]

A rhyme: “Baccus may give us Wine / That we may cherefully w[hine?]” in ink, with crossed-out words and stamp of ownership

From front endpapers of The Tea-Table Miscellany by Allan Ramsay (1750). [Here]