July 23, 2014

Found poems from fold-outs left folded. (1, 2)

February 6, 2014
Linked errata. 
From the front matter of The Liberal: Verse and Prose from the South, v. 1 (1822). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 3, 2008.

Linked errata. 

From the front matter of The Liberal: Verse and Prose from the South, v. 1 (1822). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 3, 2008.

January 30, 2014
Composed by torn library artifacts: “BOOKS ARE LIT FOR TWO WEEKS.” 
From the back matter of The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (1922). Original from the University of Virginia. Digitized September 11, 2009.

Composed by torn library artifacts: “BOOKS ARE LIT FOR TWO WEEKS.” 

From the back matter of The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (1922). Original from the University of Virginia. Digitized September 11, 2009.

September 25, 2013
Erasure poem.
From The Narrative and Affidavit-men Detected: or, Collcott and Robin Put to the Blush (1730). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 30, 2009.

Erasure poem.

From The Narrative and Affidavit-men Detected: or, Collcott and Robin Put to the Blush (1730). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 30, 2009.

June 4, 2013
Poem clipped, pasted into front endpapers, and edited.
From the front matter of Fashion, The Emigrants, and Other Poems by Thomas Gillet (1819). Original from Oxford University. Digitized August 9, 2006.

Poem clipped, pasted into front endpapers, and edited.

From the front matter of Fashion, The Emigrants, and Other Poems by Thomas Gillet (1819). Original from Oxford University. Digitized August 9, 2006.

May 29, 2013

Stains.

Throughout How the Children Raised the Wind by Edna Lyall (1896). Original from Harvard University. Digitized April 24, 2008.

May 5, 2013
Torn paper poem.
From the back matter of A Princess of Java: A Tale of the Far East by Sarah Jane Higginson (1887). Original from Harvard University. Digitized July 25, 2008.

Torn paper poem.

From the back matter of A Princess of Java: A Tale of the Far East by Sarah Jane Higginson (1887). Original from Harvard University. Digitized July 25, 2008.

April 13, 2013

gapers:

theartofgooglebooks:

The Book That Was To Come

April 13th, 1PM
Claudia Cassidy Theater, Chicago Cultural Center
Part of The Poetry Center of Chicago’s annual reading series

Krissy Wilson, of The Art of Google Books, will read and discuss a suite of cento poems written using marginalia digitized by Google Books.

A discrete waypoint in our understanding of what the book might become, where it is (no longer) bound. Featuring poets and artists whose work concerns the past and future of literary forms, including recipients of the Envisioning the Future of the Book commission from the Center for Book & Paper Arts at Columbia College. Interventions may include artists’ books, works between page and screen, poems made from Google Books marginalia, and Orlando re-written by the vibrations of an oak tree.

Neat! Added it to the calendar.

This is today! 

April 13, 2013

Erasure poems.

Throughout A West Point Yearling by Paul Bernard Malone (1911). Original from the University of Virginia. Digitized March 31, 2011.

April 13, 2013
Marginalia: “Bright with this star’s reflected glow— / Brighter, since Christ too [dared?] to go!”
From p. 82 of Youth: And Other Poems by Charles Hanson Towne (1911). Original from Harvard University. Digitized February 23, 2009.

Marginalia: “Bright with this star’s reflected glow— / Brighter, since Christ too [dared?] to go!”

From p. 82 of Youth: And Other Poems by Charles Hanson Towne (1911). Original from Harvard University. Digitized February 23, 2009.

April 7, 2013

Censored lines.

From The Grotto by Peter Drake (1733). Original from Oxford University. Digitized June 13, 2008.

April 7, 2013

The Book That Was To Come

April 13th, 1PM
Claudia Cassidy Theater, Chicago Cultural Center
Part of The Poetry Center of Chicago's annual reading series

Krissy Wilson, of The Art of Google Books, will read and discuss a suite of cento poems written using marginalia digitized by Google Books.

A discrete waypoint in our understanding of what the book might become, where it is (no longer) bound. Featuring poets and artists whose work concerns the past and future of literary forms, including recipients of the Envisioning the Future of the Book commission from the Center for Book & Paper Arts at Columbia College. Interventions may include artists’ books, works between page and screen, poems made from Google Books marginalia, and Orlando re-written by the vibrations of an oak tree.

March 24, 2013
A saucy bookplate: “A Pleader to the Needer When a Reader.”
From the back matter of England’s Path to Wealth and Honour, In a Dialogue Between an English-man and a Dutch-man by James Puckle (1718). Original from Oxford University. Digitized July 4, 2006.

A saucy bookplate: “A Pleader to the Needer When a Reader.”

From the back matter of England’s Path to Wealth and Honour, In a Dialogue Between an English-man and a Dutch-man by James Puckle (1718). Original from Oxford University. Digitized July 4, 2006.

March 4, 2013
"Vacant Places" pasted in.
From the front matter of Verses for My Children by Eleanor Crewdson (1849). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 27, 2007.

"Vacant Places" pasted in.

From the front matter of Verses for My Children by Eleanor Crewdson (1849). Original from Oxford University. Digitized April 27, 2007.

February 25, 2013
Reader comments on image—“Modesty!!”—and another reader questions the comment—”?”
From p. 26 of Poems by Samuel Rogers by Samuel Rogers (1816). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 12, 2008.

Reader comments on image—“Modesty!!”—and another reader questions the comment—”?”

From p. 26 of Poems by Samuel Rogers by Samuel Rogers (1816). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized March 12, 2008.