Posts tagged provenance

Stamps that trace the owner’s practice through Billings, Wenatchee, Enumclaw, and Cashmere

From the front matter of The ABC of Fitting Glasses: A Manual for the Optician by Edmund Turney Allen (1897). Original from the University of California. Digitized February 20, 2009.

Inscription of the Grecian Coffee House, London.

From the title page of Une Journée des Parques: A Day’s Work of the Fates by Alain René Le Sage (1745). Original from Columbia University. Digitized April 13, 2009.

A reader plays a game with wet ink by writing in reverse and turning the page. 

From London’s Lamentations: or, A Serious Discourse Concerning That Late Fiery Dispensation that Turned Our (Once Renowned) City into a Ruinous Heap by Thomas Brooks (1670). Original from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Digitized October 6, 2009.

Handwritten letter, addressing author, confirms the conclusion of the text.

My dear Dr. Kunz;

Replying to your inquiry, I can recall no instance of an Eskimo of the Whale Sound region wearing a ring.

On one of my earlier expeditions I took an assortment of bright rings along in addition to needles, thimbles, (?), soap, etc. for the women of the tribe.

I found they had no attraction. Women would accept them as gifts and hang them up in their huts or houses but would not accept them in payment for anything + would not wear them.

Sorry I cannot be of more assistance to you. Best regards.

Sincerely,
Suary. 

The text reads “Rings are not in favor with the Eskimos, who do not appear to make or wear any.”

Between p. 30-31 of Rings for the Finger: From the Earliest Known Times, to the Present, with Full Descriptions of the Origin, Early Making, Materials, the Archaeology, History, for Affection, for Love, for Engagement, for Wedding, Commemorative, Mourning, Etc. by George Frederick Kunz (1917). Original from the University of California. Digitized February 18, 2011.

Bookplate reads “Not to be loaned on any condition,” a statement contradicted by the transfer of ownership to Harvard (Gray Herbarium), rebinding, digitization, and digital distribution.

From the front matter of A System of Vegetables, v.1, by Carl von Linné and Johan Elmgre* (1783). 

*Metadata provided by Google Books. 

Part of the book’s provenance documented in stamps; it was in the ownership of Dr. John C. Peters, who then presented it to the New York Academy of Medicine. They donated to the New Hampshire State Library until it was discarded; from there, It made its way to the Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine (Google notes that it is currently in Harvard’s collection; the Countway is “an alliance of the Boston Medical Library and Harvard Medical School”).

From the front matter of On Diseases of the Skin, by Sir Erasmus Wilson (1857). [Here]