August 4, 2011

Printed plate (“U.S. frigate United States, under full sail”); printed plate obscured by protective tissue paper, creating a ghostly image.

From p.viii and p.x of The Kedge-Anchor; or, Young Sailor’s Assistant by W. N. Brady (1848).  [Here]

August 4, 2011

Pamphlet bound in larger casing; images not cropped to page size. Includes employee’s gloved fingers, the digitization environment (and, in this case, the tissue paper meant to protect the plate obscures the text on the opposite page)

From p.44-45, and throughout, Sketches of Young Gentlemen: Dedicated to the Young Ladies by Charles Dickens, Hablot Knight Browne (1838). [Here]

July 28, 2011

Plates digitized with protective tissue paper over them, with ghostly effect.

From various pages of Indiana’s Roll of Honor by David Stevenson and Theodore T. Scribner (1864). [Here]

March 29, 2011
Tissue paper meant to protect a printed plate was digitized as its own page
From p.v, The life and times of Thomas Wilson Dorr: with outlines of the political history of Rhode Island by Dan King (1859). [Here]

Tissue paper meant to protect a printed plate was digitized as its own page

From p.v, The life and times of Thomas Wilson Dorr: with outlines of the political history of Rhode Island by Dan King (1859). [Here]