March 29, 2013

Child-painted illustrations.

Throughout History of England, In Words of One Syllable by Helen W. Pierson (1884). Original from the New York Public Library. Digitized March 2, 2007.

March 5, 2013

Child-painted or workshop-stenciled plates.

Throughout Rhymes for My Children (1839). Original from Harvard University. Digitized October 29, 2008.

March 4, 2013

Child-painted plates.

Throughout Rainbows for Children by Caroline Sturgis Tappan (1848). Original from Harvard University. Digitized October 3, 2007.

January 10, 2013
Child-colored plate.
From the title page of Olney’s First Lessons in Arithmetic by Edward Olney (1884).Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized September 9, 2009.

Child-colored plate.

From the title page of Olney’s First Lessons in Arithmetic by Edward Olney (1884).Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized September 9, 2009.

July 16, 2012
Child-painted plate.
From Divine and Moral Songs for Children by Isaac Watts (1866). Original from Harvard University. Digitized February 17, 2006.

Child-painted plate.

From Divine and Moral Songs for Children by Isaac Watts (1866). Original from Harvard University. Digitized February 17, 2006.

May 25, 2012

Child-colored plates.

Throughout Child’s Magazine, v. 2 (1816). Original from the University of Michigan. Digitized June 15, 2007.

December 7, 2011

Plates painted by child reader (and a painted chicken). 

From various pages of The Beautiful Book for Little Children (1875). [Here]

Note: As a scholar and enthusiast of the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, this is an especially exciting find. The rare books cataloging phrase used to describe texts like these is “Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.” More “young owner” books digitized at the UFDC. —kcw

November 2, 2011

Unknown; colored endpapers?

From the front matter of The Odyssey, v. 1, by Homerus, trans. Alexander Pope, ed. Gilbert Wakefield (1796). [Here]

April 28, 2011

Plates colored by reader (gouache or watercolor)

From various pages of Mysteries of the Backwoods by T. B. Thorpe (1816). [Here]